Are there unfamiliar terms on your roofing proposal?

When you receive a proposal for a new roof some of the terms used may not be familiar to you – sheathing, underlayment, etc. What exactly are they? Do I need them? And, what if my proposal doesn’t contain them?

This roofing materials list courtesy of our friends at GAF can help you understand your proposal and allow you to question your roofing contractor to make sure they’ve included everything..

Sheathing

Roof sheathing or decking is the wood foundation layer that contractors use to attach shingles and other roof coverings to the home. Sheathing is a critical component of an overall roofing system. This part is commonly made from plywood or OSB and is crucial to provide a structural substrate for the installation of your roofing system. Sheathing is necessary for a roof replacement or repair project if there is a damaged area of the wood deck that needs to be replaced.

Roof Underlayment/Deck Protection

Roof underlayment helps to prevent wind-driven rain from infiltrating the roof system. For example, GAF Tiger PawTM Premium roof deck protection is a protective underlayment added above the sheathing and below the roofing shingles to help keep the roof system dry and strong. You’ll need enough underlayment to cover the entire roof surface. It is sold in rolls, so check how much surface area each roll covers and double-check the roof’s measurements before buying. To properly install the roof deck protection, you’ll want to make sure to purchase enough plastic cap nails or plastic cap staples.

Roof Leak Barrier

Roof Leak Barrier helps protect the vulnerable areas of the roof like the eaves and valleys. This roofing product, like GAF WeatherWatch® mineral-surfaced leak barrier, is crucial to install in areas with cold weather at the eave, valley, around penetrations and other vulnerable areas. This will help prevent damaging leaks caused by ice dams or wind-driven rain.

Shingles

Shingles are what cover the roof to help protect the entire structure underneath it. It goes without saying you’ll need enough shingles to cover the entire roof surface. Your roofing contractor should be experienced in calculating the appropriate amount for your house and a good roofing contractor has contingency measures in place if they do miscalculate. In any case extra shingles are good to have on hand in case any future repairs are needed.

Starter Strip Shingles

Starter strip shingles are the first set of long rectangular shingles that get installed around roof edges at the eave and rake edges of the roof to help prevent shingle blow-off. Be sure to check with your roofing manufacturer, as some shingles may require a specific starter strip product to be used with the specific shingle you’re installing.

Hip and Ridge Cap Shingles

The hip and ridges of a roof can be vulnerable to wind and wind-driven rain due to the intersection of roof planes. This is where hip and ridge cap shingles come into play. These shingles are installed along these areas to help protect and provide an elegant finishing touch.

Flashing

Flashing is an essential roof component that helps redirect water away from areas like the chimneys, pipes, valleys, edges, and walls so make sure you have sufficient roof flashing to cover all vulnerable areas. Products such as GAF’s Master Flow® Roof Flashing can help protect the area around roof pipes. If you’ve seen the roof in person, you may have an idea of how much you need to install, but you can also utilize tools such as an estimating app to ensure you’re providing the homeowner with an accurate estimate.

Roof Ventilation

Roof vents are a vital piece of a roof’s ventilation system. To function, an attic ventilation system must be balanced, with equal amounts of air coming in and going out. This continuous, balanced flow of air helps to reduce overheating and moisture build-up, which can result in ice damming and damage to your roofing system.

Fascia Board

The fascia board is another helpful component of the roof frame. It’s placed at the end of the rafters or trusses and helps protect them against water damage. Gutters get hung from the fascia board, which is commonly made of wood or composite boards.

If you have questions about your proposal whether it’s from George J Keller & Sons or another roofing contractor we’d be happy to go over it with you. Call us today at 973-927-0963 and speak with one of our roofing experts – we’ll make sure your proposal is complete!